Color Impact 2023 was a great success. These pages are left here for archival purposes.

We hope to see you at a future Color Council meeting! Our next conference in June 2025.


June 11-15, 2023

Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, USA

Afternoon Sessions
Short Courses, Activities and Tours

IMPORTANT: You must register for Afternoon Sessions, reserve a dorm and register for the conference AT THE SAME TIME.

Please review all of the Afternoon Sessions on offer and be ready to sign up when you register for the conference!


Monday
2:15 - 5:30
$90

(CANCELLED)Intro to the World of the RAL DESIGN System (CANCELLED) 

Monday
2:15 - 5:30
$90

The Eye Opener Series: An Intro to the Color Literacy Project -  Maggie Maggio and Robin Kingsburgh
Participants in this workshop will get the chance to experience a selection of the hands-on beta-test materials and activities which are part of the Eye Opener Series and STEAM Series for the current teacher training program with partner schools. This first two series in the training curriculum are focused on color perception, the human visual system, and naming, describing and ordering color. Exercises will include exploration of color illusions and the comparative mixing of lights, pastels, and spinning disks. Participants will be given free access to the beta-test CLP Teacher Guides and a mini Colour Explorer Tool kit to take home.

The primary goal of the ISCC/AIC Colour Literacy Project (CLP)* is to design and test a state-of-the-art,multi-disciplinary, foundational color curricula for use by teachers at all levels. The project team is currently testing materials and activities that foster critical thinking and creativity, are freely accessible and use low-cost resources, and which may be used as-is or further modified by teachers to best suit the needs of their classroom.

*The Colour Literacy Project is a joint effort of the Inter-Society Color Council of the United States (ISCC) and the International Color Association (AIC).

Monday
2:15 - 4:15
$60

Measuring, Modeling and Rendering Surface Appearance - James Ferwerda
Real-world surfaces often have complex topographic and material properties. Creating accurate and realistic digital models of these surfaces is a topic of great interest to many fields. In this course we will describe the physical processes and visual mechanisms that determine surface appearance, and then survey efforts to develop image-based systems for measuring, modeling, and rendering the appearances of complex surfaces. We will describe the capabilities and limitations of different systems, and will provide a tutorial on the implementation, calibration, use, and assessment of a system for creating digital models of paintings, manuscripts, and other complex textured surfaces.

Monday
2:15 - 4:15
$60

Techniques for Creating Colorful, Decipherable Images for Color-blind and Sight-impaired Persons - Bill Fischer
Learn how to design high-quality color experiences for persons with visual impairments, including color-blindness, low-vision, photophobia, and scotopic sensitivity syndrome.

Monday
2:15 - 3:15
free

Guided Tour of the RIT Glass Laboratory (CLOSED FULL)

Monday
3:30 - 4:30
free

Beyond the Pale (Ale) and Behind the Blush (Wine): The Colors of Potent Potables - Mark Fairchild and Stephen Viggiano
They say you can't judge a book by its cover, but how about what you drink? We will discuss the implications of the color of beer and wine, and tools that are used to communicate that color. It is said that the First Taste is with your eyes. Yes it is true, and yes the hue is important!

Monday
4:30 - 5:30
$30

Fifty Shades of Feeling - Ellen Divers and Domicele Jonauskaite
Colors carry affective connotations – some are associated with positive emotions, others with negative, and they can vary in levels of intensity. However, before one can start linking colors and emotions in practice, one must deal with challenges related to operationalization of color as well as emotion. This course is for anyone who wants to feel more confident thinking about and discussing color and emotion research. We will discuss quantitative and qualitative research methods employed to study how people affectively respond to color, along with their advantages and limitations. The interactive discussion and participants’ personal insights will be supplemented with the most recent scientific findings in the field. 

Monday
4:30 - 5:30
free

Beyond RGB: Low-Barrier-to-Entry Multispectral Imaging for Color-Accurate Art Documentation and Reproduction - Leah Humenuck
Beyond RGB is a low-barrier to entry multispectral system built for color-accurate cultural heritage documentation and reproduction. Historically, multispectral imaging has been high cost and requires specialist training which has limited the use of this technology for many small to mid-sized cultural heritage institutions. Mixed in with these limitations, traditional photo documentation can end up requiring post processing, which is subjective to the person performing it. A solution to these challenges is found by pairing an RGB camera with LED lights to create a multispectral system. This system uses a prosumer RGB camera, LED lights, and an open-access multispectral image processing software designed by RIT software engineering students. This process uses optimized LED recipes to image artwork in two captures, allowing for efficient workflow. The result is a color-accurate master file, also containing spectral information regarding the artwork. This demonstration would show the setup and imaging process as well as a walkthrough of the image processing software. 

Monday
4:45 - 5:45
free

There’s No Such Thing as Color Space…Prove Me Wrong - Mark D. Fairchild
This roundtable discussion examines the question of what constitutes a color space and whether they have any significant perceptual meaning. The term “color space” is very commonly used, but applied to a wide variety of specifications from device signal values (RGB, CMYK, YCbCr, ICtCp), to cone responses (LMS), to tristimulus values (XYZ) and chromaticity coordinates (xy, u’v’), to cone contrasts (ΔL,ΔM,ΔS), to color differences (ΔL*Δa*Δb*, ΔL*ΔC*ΔH), to opponent responses (L+M+S, L-M, L+M-S)to quasi-appearance models (CIELAB, CIELUV), to color appearance models (CIECAM02, CIECAM16), to color order systems (Munsell, NCS), etc. It is reasonable to ask whether any of these systems benefit our scientific understanding of color perception by being expressed as three-dimensional spaces rather than simply three, or more, independent perceptual dimensions. Color appearance is best expressed using five independent perceptual dimensions and squeezing those into three- or five-dimensional spaces is not helpful. The same can likely be said for color difference and encoding metrics. Mark will briefly review this concept, pose questions, and facilitate an open round-table discussion. Prove him wrong! (If these questions do not fill the allotted time, we can discuss the fact that there is no such thing as color constancy!)

All Day

Independent walking tours of the RIT Galleries and Installations. More information HERE.

Tuesday
2:15 - 5:30
$90


LED Lighting: The Intersection of Color Science and Design - Michael J. Murdoch and Kimberly R. Mercier
Currently, LED technology leads the market for electric lighting, primarily promoted for its substantial energy efficiency. Beyond energy, however, the flexibility offered by solid-state lighting (SSL) – including LED and OLED – allows lighting to provide a breadth of benefits to the human experience: color, vision, health, art, performance, and happiness.

This course will be provided jointly by a color scientist and a lighting designer, each bringing their own perspective to the multi-disciplinary field of lighting. The instructors will explore an apparent collision course between discoveries made in lighting research, progress made in LED technologies, and preferences in approaches to lighting applications. Focusing on color in architectural lighting environments, they will cover topics including:

- LED light generation, white and colored LEDs
- Color rendition, the effect of light source on object color
- Light distribution and the design of appearance
-Healthy lighting, including more than what we see
- Energy and money, impact on design and controls
- System implementations, LED possibilities and architectures

Understanding some of each of these topics will illuminate how lighting designers, scientists, and engineers collaborate to impact the LED lighting products available, the codes that are written, and the outcomes of architectural designs and implementations. Mike and Kim will provide suggestions for the application of lighting color science knowledge to further the areas of art, design, product manufacturing, and human wellness.

The course will be given in the Munsell Color Science Laboratory, allowing participants to see and use advanced LED lighting systems and color measurement instruments.

Tuesday
2:15 - 5:30
$90

The Natural Colour System: A Toolbox for Colour Designers - Anders Nilsson
A knowledge of colour order systems is central to professional colour design work. This three-hour course will include a basic introduction to the NCS colour order system with a presentation of products and tools followed by demonstrations and hands-on exercises exploring the use of the NCS system by designers. All hands-on materials and course documentation will be provided.

Tuesday
2:15 - 4:15
$60

Fundamentals of Psychophysics - James Ferwerda
Psychophysical methods from experimental psychology can be used to quantify the relationships between the physical properties of the world and the qualities people perceive. The results of psychophysical experiments can be used to create models of human perception that can guide the development of effective color imaging algorithms and enabling interfaces. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychophysics and teaches attendees how to develop experiments that can be used to advance color imaging research and applications. Hands-on examples are used throughout so that attendees understand how to design and run their own experiments, analyze the results, and develop perceptually-based algorithms and applications.

Tuesday
2:15 - 4:15
$60

Connecting with Color - Jason Bemis  
Our journey begins on a planet that coevolved with light. This evolution led to the rise of fungi, plants, and insects that simultaneously communicated with one another through Light, color, and scent. Thus began a new interwoven system of rules and processes that initiated the beginning of what is known as our eco-system. Applied principles of the effects of color on our physical, psychological, and physiological responses will be explored through architecture, design, and visual systems.

Tuesday
2:15 - 3:15
free

Tuesday
3:30 - 5:30
free

Color Explorer Room - Maggie Maggio and Robin Kingsburgh
Drop in any time for hands-on color exploration. Team members from the Color Literacy Project will be on hand to guide visitors through multiple stations with tools and materials for exploring:
1. the spectrum with prisms, CD's and diffraction gratings
2. light with LED's, lasers, polarizing filters, tablets, and colored shadows
3. vision acuity and limited color vision
4. naming, sorting and ordering color in 2D and 3D
5. partitive mixing with spinning disks 6. simultaneous and successive contrasts and the Munker-White illusion.


Tuesday
3:30 - 4:30
free

Tuesday
4:30 - 5:30
$30

Turning the Kaleidoscope: Two perspectives on the meaning of color - Ellen Divers 
This course is for anyone interested in understanding the meanings and impressions colors convey in the context of design. Participants will collectively build meaning profiles for four types of colors (pale, dark, vivid and neutral) and compare them to research findings. We will compare two approaches to understanding color meaning:  the Hue Paradigm (HP) and the Value-Chroma Paradigm (VCP) and how each can be useful in the design process.

Tuesday
4:30 - 5:30
$30

Alphabet Soup of Color Notation - Robin Myers and Robert Buckley
For every named color - from Aegean Teal to Zesty Lime - there exist at least a dozen different ways to communicate that color. Color notations and specifications used by different communities within the Inter-Society Color Council include PMS, NCS, RAL, XYZ, RGB, LAB, LCH, ICC and CMYK. Colors may be described using a PMS number, sRGB, L*a*b*, HEX and CMYK data. This course will sort out these different notations, show how they are related and most importantly help you apply this understanding in your work. We will have a variety of fandecks, other color systems and measuring tools on hand to work with and attendees are invited to submit notations or color specifications beforehand for discussion. 

All Day

Independent walking tours of the RIT Galleries and Installations. More information HERE.

Wednesday
2:15 - 5:30
$90

Expanded Color Gamut Printing - Abhay Sharma
Expanded color gamut printing and color reproduction with CMYK-OGV inks. The benefits for printing and proofing in commercial printing and package printing to reduce costs and improve sustainability and environmental impact. The session will review the concepts and color science behind this development followed by hands-on practical review of ECG software and print samples applicable to spot color and PANTONE reproduction.

Wednesday
2:15 - 5:30
$90


Color For Everyone - Jean Hoskin, Ann Laidlaw and Jodi Baker
We all think that color is obvious to everyone who views objects, and yet it is elusive in its description and communication. Three ISCC members will bring together information and interactive experiences to guide attendees through the description and communication of color. We will outline color communication for art and creative processes, manufacturing of consumer products, and highlight research and standard methods to help bring clarity to this inexact science of color. This three part workshop is a deep dive into visual evaluation, translating the visual evaluation to numeric values with instrumentation, and fundamental building blocks for a color program.

Wednesday
2:15 - 4:15
$60

Selection of Pigments for Color Applications - Romesh Kumar

It is very important to understand the limitations for proper selection of organic pigments for a given application. In this presentation, discussion will focus on basic chemistry, physical and chemical properties, and a comprehensive guide to selection of pigments for your coloration needs. 

Wednesday
2:15 - 4:15
$60


Digital Color Management: From Basics to ACES - Edward J. Giorgianni
The course will begin with a brief introduction to ACES, the Academy Color Encoding System developed by the Science and Technology Council of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for digital color management in motion picture and television production. Descriptions and illustrations of the fundamental concepts of color management paradigms, system architectures, and digital color encoding methods will then be described. Practical applications will be shown to illustrate how these fundamental concepts have been successfully employed on various color-managed system. Finally, in the second half of the tutorial, the ACES system itself will be described and explained. Topics will include how color is uniquely represented throughout the ACES system, how ACES images are created and digitally encoded from highly disparate types of input media and devices, how ACES images are used in post-production, image interchange, and image archiving, and how they are transformed for display applications including motion picture and television viewing.

Wednesday
2:15 - 3:15
free

Light Bathing - Michael J. Murdoch

In the Dynamic Visual Adaptation Lab, participants will be immersed in a dynamic colored light for a 30-minute session of illuminated relaxation. The DVA Lab is not very large, so the group will be limited to 8 participants. If needed we can run the program twice in a 1-hour block, or perhaps we can create a 15-minute program to be run 4x to allow more participation. Note this is fun, not science.

Wednesday
2:15 - 3:15
free

Guided Tour of the RIT Glass Laboratory(CLOSED FULL)

Wednesday
2:15 - 3:15
free

Guided Tour of the Labs at the Center for Imaging Science
Come visit the Center for Imaging Science and learn about our programs and research labs. Lab tours will include the VR / eye tracking lab, cultural heritage imaging lab, drone lab, device calibration lab, goniometry lab, optics lab, and freshman imaging lab. Take a thermal image selfie and fly a drone while you’re here.

Wednesday
3:30 - 4:30
free

Guided Tour of the Labs at the Center for Imaging Science
Come visit the Center for Imaging Science and learn about our programs and research labs. Lab tours will include the VR / eye tracking lab, cultural heritage imaging lab, drone lab, device calibration lab, goniometry lab, optics lab, and freshman imaging lab. Take a thermal image selfie and fly a drone while you’re here.

Wednesday
4:30 - 5:30
$30

The Power of Red - John Seymour
Google estimates that there are 700 million webpages on color psychology. Many of these webpages pontificate on the psychological power of color and offer a list of specific colors and their presumed effect on our emotions and decision making. It is common for the authors to provide little by way of explanation for why, and absolutely nothing when it comes to description and citation of solid experimental evidence. How much of this pop psychology on color is supported by solid experimentation? This tutorial surveys the available literature on the psychology of the color red. This is arguably one of the most noticeable of colors and likely the most research in color psychology, so it can be expected to have a readily discernible psychological impact. Looking at red is thus a litmus test for the whole of psychology of colors.

Wednesday
4:30 - 5:30
$30

(CANCELLED) LOVE CANAL AUGMENTED Site : Nonsite (Where Did the Love Go?) - Amanda Long
Site : Nonsite (Where Did the Love Go?) is an exploration of public space, memory, and conceptual art in relation to Love Canal in Niagara Falls, NY. Starting with the premise that reclaimed Superfund sites should be displayed as works in progress representing ecological and social healing, this course in speculative design expands upon the legacy of Robert Smithson, Nancy Holt, and Mel Chin to create a framework for public art as ecological activism. Works of public sculpture, civic markers, text, video, and digital phytoremediation gardens will be created to mark and commemorate the first Superfund site, using augmented reality (AR) with the open-source software Hoverlay to bring the site of Love Canal to the viewer. Speculatively, the Niagara Falls City Council is undertaking an exciting new project, Love Canal Augmented, which is a virtual walking tour showcasing the major ecological preservation mechanisms of the first Superfund site and its key properties and history visualized with AR. The program will launch at the ISCC conference in June 2023. Artists interested in contributing AR artwork or simply learning more about AR with Hoverlay are encouraged to attend the workshop. The workshop includes an app with the AR open-source platform Hoverlay being utilized, along with a demo of the production process and timeline. No previous AR experience is required. This interactive workshop will be an opportunity to ask questions and discuss ideas. We will also look at what other sites, for example the Metropolitan Museum of Art, are doing with AR; the big difference between those projects and this one is that this one uses free software, which reduces the price for participants. Curiosity and creativity are greatly encouraged! Currently, the Love Canal site has only a fence and "Do Not Trespass" signage. In response to this lack of information, the creative workshop focuses on the intersection of the environment and data visualization, with emerging technology layering information about the site with an AR app. Special emphasis in the activity will be given to color and computer vision for communicating toxic waste danger and polychromy.  

All Day

Independent walking tours of the RIT Galleries and Installations. More information HERE.

Thursday
12:45 - 2:15
free

Color Literacy Project Forum 
Color & the Perceiver

Join us for Colour Literacy Forum #5: Color & the Perceiver. This event will take place as a hybrid gathering –– in person at Color Impact 2023 and also online via Zoom.

Color is a perceptual experience, and each perceiver has a unique point of view. In this forum, our speakers will investigate the relationship between color vision and visual literacy, which can be described as our ability to navigate through the world using information provided by our visual system, our memories, and other sensory input.

Be part of the forum to learn how color perception works, and why designers from all industries need to be aware of variations in color vision among the population –– to realize the real-world applications that can enhance our well-being and ensure access to resources for everyone.

Speakers: Dr. Ming Ronnier Luo and Dr. Maria Olkkonen. Abstracts and bios are available here.

This forum is the third in a 4-part series about color perception. Forum #3 focused on color and light; Forum #4 explored color and materials.

Thursday
2:15 - 5:00
free

Munsell Color Science Laboratory Open House
Drop by anytime for a tour of the Lab, speak to students about their work and see what's new in the world of color science at RIT. 

Thursday
2:15 - 3:15
free

Tour of the MAGIC Center (CLOSED FULL)

Thursday
3:30 - 4:30
free

Tour of the MAGIC Center



IMPORTANT: You must register for Afternoon Sessions, reserve a dorm and register for the conference AT THE SAME TIME.

Once you have registered for the conference, you will NOT be able to go back
and register for Afternoon Sessions or dormitory accommodations later.

REGISTRATION CLOSED





The Inter-Society Color Council advances the knowledge of color as it relates to art, science, industry and design.
Each of these fields enriches the others, furthering the general objective of color education.


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